Here are some things to consider doing. Some items may not be applicable to you.

Medications

Approx. 4 of every 1000 prescriptions are wrong (e.g., wrong dose, allergic reactions, wrong therapy)

Before taking medications:

  • Confirm that the medicine has been prescribed for you – never self-medicate

If planning to take more than one medication at a time:

  • Don’t take more than one medication at a time before discussing with your doctor
  • Check ConsumerMedSafety to ensure the combination isn’t dangerous

Before doctor prescribes medication, especially an antibiotic or heart medication:

  • Ensure doctor knows what medications you’re currently taking
  • Ensure doctor knows your drug allergy history
  • Ask about any changes in the medication’s name or dosage

If you have reduced kidney or liver function:

  • Ensure your medication is reduced or changed as appropriate

If your doctor prescribes medication:

  • Ask the doctor and/or pharmacist for following (in writing, if feasible):
    • Name of the medication
    • What the medication is supposed to do
    • Dosage
    • How and when the medication should be taken
    • How long you should take the medication
    • Medicines (e.g., over-the-counter), food, drinks, etc. which shouldn’t be taken in combination with the medication
    • Activities which should be avoided while taking the medication
    • Possible side effects
    • What to do if you miss a dose
  • Try to use one pharmacy for all of your prescriptions so they will be more likely to catch potentially dangerous drug interactions and/or inappropriate prescriptions

Children:

If you administer over-the-counter medication:

  • Don’t give aspirin to children can cause Reye’s disease
  • Don’t give ibuprofen to children 6 months or younger
  • Follow recommended dosage by weight (preferred) or age on container
  • Don’t continue medication too long

If any of the following:

  • Child is 3 months or younger
  • Child continues to experience discomfort
  • Child is lethargic
  • Child has high fever
    • Seek medical attention

After you finish taking antibiotics:

  • Throw out leftover anti-biotics (misuse of antibiotics leads to their ineffectiveness)

Comments


  1. On August 14th, 2015, Christine Riederer said:

    Good medication checklist. Also ask the doctor which potential drug interactions could happen when you start the new medication. This assures that: (1) You have given that doctor your current medication list (2) S/he is cognizant of all the medications you are already taking on a regular basis

    Any medication list you provide to your doctors should also list vitamins, minerals, topical creams and suppositories that you use on a regular basis. Many medications do interact with various vitamins and minerals, as well as creams and topical agents. Sometimes the combination of medications and minerals can make you sun-sensitive, etc.,

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